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GUITAR #48 by Peter Malinoski


Guitar #48 by Peter Malinoski

Peter Malinoski is in no doubt about his guitars. They are Art Guitars. And in case you hadn’t noticed yet, beautiful guitars for me are works that embody the ethos and philosophy of their creator – it is a measure of how well the ideas of functionality, craft, design and aesthetics have translated into the finished article. Again, this manages to be sculpture AND a thoroughgoing musical instrument at the same time.

Peter Malinoski has a very, very interesting take on the history and design of solid bodied guitars that obviously is at the root of his design philosophy:

“I think solid body electric guitars are stuck in the past and they have become stunted by their own success.
“From the beginning, solid body electric guitars were designed for mass production- their construction was made to accommodate efficient mass production and not at all fine construction. If it was too difficult to make, it would be too expensive to mass produce and few people would buy them. The guitar companies, the successful guitar companies, knew this and were willing to compromise the quality of their designs in order to make cheap, mass produced instruments to sell at low prices. This is the root history of solid body guitars and it has become their tradition and the prevailing understanding of how solid body electric guitars “should” be made.
“Compare this now to the history of acoustic guitars, which like violins and other traditional stringed instruments were developed long before mass production. These instruments enjoyed a long gestation of development by master builders to become mature instruments, thereby making their mass production a much more difficult process to produce the same results. Where solid body electric guitars were designed for ease of mass production, acoustic guitars would never compromise their design integrity for mass production.
“So now we accept that solid body electric guitars should be built about the same way as they were 60 years ago. I think this is a sad fact and it is my desire to give these wonderful instruments the respect they deserve by eliminating mass production techniques and mass production influenced design biases in favor of handcrafted individualism.
“It is not my intention to reinvent the instrument, there are ideas that are vital to their function such as scale and dimensions. Wire wrapped around a magnet to create sound producing energy is a profoundly elegant idea that is central to the concept of the electric guitar. But bolt on necks, standardized body shapes, formless flat backs with hideous screw in cover plates that survive as design afterthoughts are just dumb craft; there are no good reasons for any of those things unless the object is just being stamped out in a factory like so many loaves of bread.
“I make guitars one at a time, one-of-a-kind. I have developed my own systems, shapes and forms that are similar with each instrument I build, but always different. The last one always affects the next one, no two are ever the same. I consider the guitar as a complete sculptural object where all forms, shapes, colors and material share a design integrity, where the back is as important as the front and the sound as important as the image; they are not simply a collection of pieces and parts. Although I use standard off the shelf components like strings, tuners and bridges, I make my own pick-ups and build them into the guitar as part of the total design integrity.
“My guitars and basses are not meant to be the do-all-end-all instrument for every utility as typically described. They aren’t built the same, they don’t look the same, they don’t sound the same as any other instrument. My intention is to create unique and beautiful instruments that are to be used to make unique and beautiful music”.

  • 24-3/4″ scale,
  • 24 medium frets @ 14″ radius,
  • oiled Mahogany and White Ash
  • neck w/ Olive fretboard, push-pull truss rod,
  • acrylic painted White Ash body
  • + oiled quilted soft Maple pickup plate,
  • Bone nut @ 1-3/4″,
  • “S” style bridge @ 2-1/8,
  • thru-body strings,
  • Gotoh mini tuners,

Comments

Malinoski built-in type 2 humbucking pick-up system with bridge transducer, single volume pot, single blend pot, 5-way selector.

Weight – 7lbs 4oz

“Very nice tone- clear and present. 5-way switch allows for individual pick-up selections and combinations in series,

parallel or out-of-phase. Blend pot controls mixture of piezo and magnetic pick-ups making for a huge amount of tone variations from treble and highs to compressed punch.

This guitar has great action and balance with long sustain”

http://www.petermalinoskiart.com/